Awarded: The John Campbell Trust Bursary

Last year I made a successful application to the John Campbell Trust’s Conference and Travel Bursary fund. I was extremely pleased when the award was confirmed, but between the Christmas holidays and other (excitedly successful!) conference travel and news delayed my public announcement.

However, I am about to put the bursary to use and there is a new round of applications being accepted so I thought today would be a good day to finally share this great news!

The Trust is a registered charity (No 802262) and is managed by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Processionals (Cilip). Started at the bequest of the late Dr John Campbell, an early member of the Institute of Information Scientists, the Trust is administered by a board of trustees chaired by Adrienne Muir. Applications are accepted in two rounds, and the next deadline is 18 November 2016 (followed by a second round, due 9 June 2017).

There are two calls for conference and travel proposals in 2016/17:

First call:
Submissions due by 17:00 on 18 November 2016
Winners will be informed by 12 December 2016
Winners should complete their itinerary by the end of December 2017

Second call:
Submissions due by 17:00 on 9 June 2017
Winners will be informed by 3 July 2017
Winners should complete their itinerary by the end of June 2018

Applications are also being accepted for Student Research Bursaries, with the same deadlines as above.

As for me, I will be using my conference and travel bursary to attend the ASIST annual meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark, which begins next week. This is the first time the annual meeting has been held in Europe and it is an excellent opportunity for me to meet with information science professionals from around the globe—whist staying relatively close to home. I will also be attending a doctoral colloquium whilst there, in addition to participating in some other student-specific activities. (Oh! And I’ll be attending as an ASIST member, which is nice!)

I encourage you to apply for a bursary of your own, and/or to share the information with other information professionals. And if you need more convincing, stay tuned for my post-conference update, or follow my adventures on Twitter at @CleverFrances, which will surely inspire you to go after your own John Campbell Trust bursary!

An award-winning membership

I was awarded a year’s membership to the European Chapter of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T) last month, supported by an anonymous donor who provided two student memberships. It was a great honour to be nominated and an even greater honour to win!

I was nominated by my director of studies, Professor Hazel Hall, who said:

Frances is thoughtful, intelligent, and conscientious, exhibiting the attributes of a promising PhD researcher and good academic citizen. Her work has won a number of awards, e.g. best paper at IDIMC2016 and ‘Outstanding contribution to university life’ at Edinburgh Napier in 2016.

I had already planned to attend the ASIS&T annual meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark. But now, I shall be attending as a member, which brings an odd sense of pride and self-confidence to it all. After all, I am now a member of a professional information science body. As my pre-PhD academic and professional background is media- and communications-based, an ASIST membership makes me feel a bit less of an academic outsider. (But I acknowledge that I will likely always be a multidisciplinary girl.)

Thank you, ASIS&T. And thank you, Hazel. And thank you, anonymous donor! I will do my best to be a productive, positive member of ASIS&T for years to come!

A broken summer

It’s been more than six weeks since I declared this to be my Thesis Summer. And honestly, I had great plans to be extremely productive, and I was actually on track to succeed. I was getting things done. I was accomplishing goals. My to-do list was getting to-done so well that I thought I might actually exceed my Thesis Summer goals.

And then, a little over three weeks ago, I went out to buy a pack of crisps and broke my ankle. (The crisps survived if you wondered.)

I was upset that the broken ankle would mean my 2016 running goals needed to be abandoned. But I remember thinking that it would be great for my Thesis Summer goals. After all, my leg was in a walking cast/boot and I was told to rest and keep my injured appendage elevated. It’s just an ankle… it won’t impact my ability to work on my PhD.

Right?

Wrong!

I was in so much pain and discomfort in that first week that I probably didn’t even hit the 25% productivity mark. And in the second week, I was struggling to hit the 50% productivity mark. But week three was a bit better, averaging 50%(ish) productivity.

I’m now half-way through week four and have been back in the office since Monday. And thankfully, I am a little over that 50% productivity mark for the week (so far).

Working at my desk—with a proper desktop computer, rather than a laptop—is certainly helping my productivity. However, I am finding it impossible to comfortably elevate my leg without my back and neck becoming uncomfortable. And that means I am constantly re-situating myself, which isn’t helping me to increase productivity.

In the next day or two, someone from the university’s occupational health team will come to evaluate my workspace. At that time, we will try to find a good temporary adjustment for me whilst I continue to heal. And with luck, that will mean that I am able to return to full (or near-full) productivity levels whilst I continue to heal.

Frustratingly, it means that I have fallen behind again. (And that I can’t run. But I’ll try not to whinge about that here.) I know that people understand, but that doesn’t help me feel less bad; less upset. It’s just that I’ve had so many little setbacks over the course of this PhD and it’s really wearing me down!

So, I am sorry that I’ve not shared weekly blog posts with you over my Thesis Summer (as I promised to do). But hopefully, an increase in productivity will mean an increase in blogging, too. Because I do have some positive things to share, too! (But not today… I’ll save them to help me increase my post count!)

As for the broken ankle, I have to wear a walking cast/boot for another 2.5 weeks solid. Then I’ll alternate between the boot and a regular shoe for another 2-6 weeks until I’m strong enough to walk completely on my own.  Happily, I am allowed to run again (slowly and for short distances) sometime in October—but I’ll be away at an academic conference so I’ll wait a few extra days for that exciting milestone.

You can read a two-week update on my personal blog here. (A four-week update will follow soon.) And if you have any clever ideas for how I might make myself a bit more comfortable whilst working at my desk, please do feel free to share!

Accepted: Managing and evaluating personal reputations on the basis of information shared on social media: a Generation X perspective

My paper, Managing and evaluating personal reputations on the basis of information shared on social media: a Generation X perspective, has been accepted for ISIC: The Information Behaviour Conference in Zadar, Croatia. The paper is co-authored by my PhD supervisors and is based on preliminary findings from one of my generation groups (Generation X) being investigated for my doctoral thesis.

The conference will take place 20-23 September at the University of Zadar and I will present my paper the morning of the 22nd (full programme here). I have 30 minutes (including time for questions) to discuss my paper and share some of the key findings presented in the full paper. The challenge will be to share enough of the highlights to motivate people to read (and cite!) the full paper, but not so much to where I bore my audience to tears.

The full paper will be available in Information Research in 2017, after which I will happily share a link to the publication. In the meantime, you can read the paper’s abstract below. (I will share my presentation slides in September.)

Managing and evaluating personal reputations on the basis of information shared on social media: a Generation X perspective

Ryan, F.Cruickshank, P.Hall, H.Lawson, A. (2016). Managing and evaluating personal reputations on the basis of information shared on social media: a Generation X perspective. Information Research.

Abstract
Introduction. The means by which individuals evaluate the personal reputations of others, and manage their own personal reputations, as determined by information shared on social media platforms, is investigated from an information science perspective. The paper is concerned with findings from a doctoral study that takes into account prior work on the building and assessment of reputations through citation practice, as explored in the domain of scientometrics.

Method. Following the practice of studies of everyday life information seeking (ELIS), a multi-step data collection process was implemented. In total forty-five participants kept diaries and took part in semi-structured interviews. In this paper fifteen of these participants are represented.

Analysis. A qualitative analysis of the data was undertaken using NVivo10 to consider the information practices of one of three age group cohort generations: Generation X.

Results. Results generated from this initial analysis show some clear alignments with established knowledge in the domain, as well as new themes to be explored further. Of particular note is that social media users are more interested in the content of the information that is shared on social media platforms than they are in the signals that this information might convey about the sharer(s). It is also rare for these users to consider the impact of information sharing on personal reputation building and evaluation.

Conclusion. The analysis of the full dataset will provide further insight on the specific theme of the role of online information in personal reputation management, and contribute to theory development related to the study of information seeking behaviour and use.

In addition to delivering my paper, I will be attending a doctoral workshop prior to the official start of the conference. I attended the conference and doctoral workshop two years ago when it was in Leeds, England. At that time (in addition to presenting a poster), I was given some great input that helped me in the development of my research methods. This time, I am hoping for some great insight into the finishing touches of my thesis and maybe the next steps after graduation.

There will also be time to do some non-academic sightseeing whilst I’m in Zadar. I have a short list of “can’t miss” churches and geocaches, but I’m more than happy to take tips on other great places to visit!

20×20 at iDocQ 6

I attended the sixth annual Information Science Doctoral Colloquium (iDocQ) on 23rd June. It was my third time attending the event and, as always, I learned a lot from the experience. This year’s iDocQ was held at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, and was co-organised by one of my fellow Centre for Social Informatics’ PhD students, Lyndsey Jenkins. (Lyndsey blogged about the day here.)

My own contribution to the day was to give one of the 20×20 presentations based on my research. Sadly, several weeks’ illness followed by a long recovery (and the pile-up of work because of it) meant that my presentation was put together at the last minute and my slides were only delivered to the conference committee the night before the event. (Bad form, I know.)

As you may know, the idea with a 20×20 is that you have 20 image-based slides that auto-advance every 20 seconds. So you really have to have your timings down. I had ordered my slides in a manner that meant if I finished speaking early, I could start talking about the next slide before it advanced and that if I over-talked, the next slide would be relevant enough to let me finish. (It’s all about segues!)

However, I (kind of) knew what I would say to each slide… but I couldn’t remember what order the slides were in. So there were a couple of instances where I’d finished talking about one slide but had no idea what the next slide was… so I couldn’t keep talking!

Yeah… maybe a bit more practice would have been good.

I suppose the good thing is that I was very confident in my delivery. And that’s a very good thing!

I have been invited to speak to a group in Edinburgh at the end of August, then I’ll be presenting a conference paper in September. Only I’ll be sure to give myself a bit more time for preparation and practice for both of them!

Anyhow, Thesis Summer is off to a good start and I am feeling confident that I will be successful in reaching my summer goals. So stay tuned for more great updates!

[Photo credits to Hazel Hall]

Thesis summer

This summer is Thesis Summer for me. It’s the summer when I must, without excuses, get my head down and write, write, write! Luckily, July and August are two months devoid of conferences, training events, seminars, and other activities that take me away from my focus. So I’ve decided that I will devote them to my thesis; I will devote them to my PhD dreams.

I began preparing for Thesis Summer in the middle of June. I knew that I needed to be caught up on all of my administrative tasks beforehand, lest I use chores like cleaning up my inbox as a method of procrastination. I also knew that I needed a clear (well, clear-ish) plan for how I would spend my time, and what my end-of-summer outcomes would be.

And now that I’ve properly prepared, I am ready to dive straight into my Thesis Summer plans. Today. One the first day of July. And it’s going to be great!

Great, but not easy. After all, Thesis Summer is all about putting in the hours; putting in the hard work. And by the end of Thesis Summer, I intend to have completed drafts of all of my findings chapters as well as my literature review. Now, I realise that doesn’t sound like a lot of work, but there is a lot of work to do before I’m ready to start writing those chapters.

A big chunk of time will be devoted to completing the coding and analysis of my data. And then there will be the act of thinking about my data, and trying to make sense of it all in relation to the literature. Oh yeah, and I’ll need to re-visit my literature, too. And that’s more than just a weekend task!

I will be breaking everything down into manageable pieces that I can build upon. The overall idea is a pyramid with data-based tasks at the bottom (preparing files, coding data, running queries and reports, and analysing data). Once I’ve built up my strong base, I will start adding to the pyramid by creating smaller reports from my data subsets, which should help me to determine the overall structure of my thesis. From there, I should be in a better position to write up my final findings chapters, which will also help me with my final literature review.

Yeah, it’s gonna be a lot of hard work!

I am also going to try to keep up with my blogging by attempting (at least) one Just a PhD post every week. And I’m going to do it all without tears! (OK, that might be an exaggeration.)

Of course, Thesis Summer won’t be a success if I just lock myself away in my office. After all, I am merely human. And therefore, I need to address my human needs, too.

So for my personal Thesis Summer goals, I will aim to spend at least one day a week not doing my PhD. That might mean a day away to the beach or maybe a weekend away to see friends around Scotland or to visit my in-laws in England. I will also aim to run at least three days a week—even if I only have time for a wee 5K. My other personal aims for the summer are general self-care measures: Eating healthily, sleeping enough (and not too much), and keeping up with my relaxation hobbies such as drawing and writing. (Yes, writing. Which means I will also be aiming to write at least one Just Frances blog post every week.)

Yeah, it’s gonna be a lot of hard work!

And I’ll need to stay motivated; I’ll need to be productive; I’ll need to be determined and inspired and devoted. But I can do it. I’m awesome like that!

Please feel free to help keep me motivated along the way. And if you’re on Twitter, you can follow my progress with my Thesis Summer hashtag, #ThesisSummer!

CSI summer meeting: A brief recap

Earlier this month, the Centre for Social Informatics group at Edinburgh Napier University’s School of Computing met for our bi-annual meeting. These meetings are a great opportunity for all of us to come together to share the great work we’ve done over the previous six months, and to discuss our current and future research projects and aims.

The meeting was chaired by Emeritus Professor Elisabeth “Lizzie” Davenport. Others in attendance were Hazel Hall, Alistair Duff, Colin Smith, Laura Muir, Tom Kane, Gemma Webster, Ella Taylor-Smith, Iris Buunk, Lyndsey Jenkins, and our newest PhD student, Alicja Pawluczuk. We also had a guest from the Centre for Computing Educational Research group, Pritam Chita, join us. Oh, and me. I was there, too.

I had intended to share individual updates for everyone. However, I know that if I try to write it all up, linking to the appropriate projects and stories, I will never get this posted. (And I will continue to fall behind on my other tasks.) So, below is a more general update for you.

The group shared a wide range of updates including successfully published papers and conference acceptances; collaborations both within and outside of the university; invited talks and presentations; and applications for funding bids and research proposals. The group also shared a number of updates about successful funding bids, winning awards, and the excitement of Ella’s PhD graduation next week.

Over the next six months, I expect there to be even more great updates—including, hopefully, my thesis submission! And maybe I’ll be in a better place to share a more detailed recap of the next meeting, too!

Training season

Spring and early summer are busy training months for me. Not as in marathon training (though it should be that, too) but rather academic training. And that means that I seem to spend quite a bit of time out of the office learning new things.

The first of this year’s trainings was the Information Science Pathway training at my university’s Sighthill campus in mid-April. The two-day event came at a time when I was still recovering from being rather ill, so I don’t think I got as much out of it as I could have. However, I did manage to pick up a few useful ideas for my methods and literature review chapters. And, importantly, I had the opportunity to network with my fellow information science PhD students from around Scotland. (Read more about the event on Professor Hazel Hall’s blog.)

In May, I travelled to Glasgow for a two-day training event run by the Scottish Graduate School of Social Science. The event, Avoiding Precarity – Strategies for the Modern Academic, included a variety of topics aimed at helping late-stage PhD students plan for their post-PhD futures. Some of the topics were a bit elementary for me, in part because of my professional background and current research interests, but I was pleased to have taken a few nuggets of wisdom from other, more relevant topics.

The big training event of the season, the Scottish Graduate School of Social Science Summer School, happened earlier this June. I attended sessions all three days, and can honestly say that I gained a few extremely useful insights into my own needs as a PhD student… especially one in her (hopefully) final stretch. As with the Avoiding Precarity event, a couple of the courses were a bit too basic for me, however, I have to realise that some of that is just because of my life experiences. But a wee spark was ignited in one of the sessions that helped me to understand what I need to do to get my own productivity back on track. (I’ll share that story later… once I catch up a bit!)

My next (and final) training of the year is iDocQ later next week. It’s a one-day training event that will also provide me with the opportunity to present my research in the form of a 20×20 presentation. Part of me wishes I didn’t have to go because I don’t want to spend another day out of the office, but part of me knows that it will be good for me on several levels—and that I will find at least one (hopefully more!) useful nugget of knowledge to keep me motivated. (I’ll share more about this later, along with my 20×20 presentation.)

So yes, it’s training season and I feel bad for feeling apathetic about it. I don’t know if it’s because I’m in my third year now and I’ve burnt out on training, if I am just too snowed under with a list of other tasks I want/need to complete, or if I am legitimately uninterested because some of it seems like review (maybe because I am in my final year, it is review?). But much like running, you have to keep training even when you don’t want to… or you risk not being able to finish the race.