Awarded: The John Campbell Trust Bursary

logoLast year I made a successful application to the John Campbell Trust’s Conference and Travel Bursary fund. I was extremely pleased when the award was confirmed, but between the Christmas holidays and other (excitedly successful!) conference travel and news delayed my public announcement.

However, I am about to put the bursary to use and there is a new round of applications being accepted so I thought today would be a good day to finally share this great news!

The Trust is a registered charity (No 802262) and is managed by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Processionals (Cilip). Started at the bequest of the late Dr John Campbell, an early member of the Institute of Information Scientists, the Trust is administered by a board of trustees chaired by Adrienne Muir. Applications are accepted in two rounds, and the next deadline is 18 November 2016 (followed by a second round, due 9 June 2017).

There are two calls for conference and travel proposals in 2016/17:

First call:
Submissions due by 17:00 on 18 November 2016
Winners will be informed by 12 December 2016
Winners should complete their itinerary by the end of December 2017

Second call:
Submissions due by 17:00 on 9 June 2017
Winners will be informed by 3 July 2017
Winners should complete their itinerary by the end of June 2018

Applications are also being accepted for Student Research Bursaries, with the same deadlines as above.

As for me, I will be using my conference and travel bursary to attend the ASIST annual meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark, which begins next week. This is the first time the annual meeting has been held in Europe and it is an excellent opportunity for me to meet with information science professionals from around the globe—whist staying relatively close to home. I will also be attending a doctoral colloquium whilst there, in addition to participating in some other student-specific activities. (Oh! And I’ll be attending as an ASIST member, which is nice!)

I encourage you to apply for a bursary of your own, and/or to share the information with other information professionals. And if you need more convincing, stay tuned for my post-conference update, or follow my adventures on Twitter at @CleverFrances, which will surely inspire you to go after your own John Campbell Trust bursary!

An award-winning membership

asist-logoI was awarded a year’s membership to the European Chapter of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T) last month, supported by an anonymous donor who provided two student memberships. It was a great honour to be nominated and an even greater honour to win!

I was nominated by my director of studies, Professor Hazel Hall, who said:

Frances is thoughtful, intelligent, and conscientious, exhibiting the attributes of a promising PhD researcher and good academic citizen. Her work has won a number of awards, e.g. best paper at IDIMC2016 and ‘Outstanding contribution to university life’ at Edinburgh Napier in 2016.

I had already planned to attend the ASIS&T annual meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark. But now, I shall be attending as a member, which brings an odd sense of pride and self-confidence to it all. After all, I am now a member of a professional information science body. As my pre-PhD academic and professional background is media- and communications-based, an ASIST membership makes me feel a bit less of an academic outsider. (But I acknowledge that I will likely always be a multidisciplinary girl.)

Thank you, ASIS&T. And thank you, Hazel. And thank you, anonymous donor! I will do my best to be a productive, positive member of ASIS&T for years to come!

IDIMC: A winning conference

2016.01.15.idimc.winningI attended the International Data and Information Management Conference in Loughborough (England) this week along with some of my colleagues from Edinburgh Napier University. The conference was a great opportunity to meet with other information science researchers—and to present my own research.

It was also a fantastic opportunity for winning! There were four potential prizes for the conference: Best paper, best poster, best 5-minute madness presentation, and a dinner quiz. And Team Napier won them all! In fact, three of the four were won by me! (I didn’t submit for the fourth, so I’m not bitter about not winning that one.)

In order of prize announcement, here’s how the awards went down:

Dinner Quiz
I was on a team with my officemate, John Mowbray. Our team (Winners or Losers, Delete As Appropriate) won by half a point. Another officemate (Iris Buunk) and my PhD supervisor (Hazel Hall) were on the second place team.

Best 5-minute madness presentation (open to PhD students)
I took this prize (which came with a £25 Amazon gift certificate) for my presentation on my PhD research. It was a quick overview of my research themes, methods, and progress to date. The winner was selected by the conference programme committee at the conference, and I was a bit surprised to have won.

Best poster (open to all)
Iris Buunk took this well-deserved prize for her poster ‘Easier, better, faster’. The winner was selected by a delegate vote at the conference. The poster was very well designed with clear, easy to understand text. It was clearly the winner! (And as I didn’t have a poster, I am not at all bitter about not winning!)

Best paper (open to all)
Much to my surprise (and excitement), the best paper award went to me (and to the paper co-authors Peter Cruickshank, Hazel Hall, and Alistair Lawson). The paper was titled ‘Personal online reputation: the development of an approach to investigate how personal reputation is evaluated and managed in online environments’.

The winner for this category was decided by anonymous peer review of all papers refereed prior to the conference. That means that the award was based on the text and the text alone. Not me as a person; not my presentation of the work. And that is such a great boost for my confidence!

(Read the full paper here or check out the presentation slides here.)

As I said, it was a winning conference. And all that winning has done wonders for my self-confidence and self-esteem. If I can keep this energy up, I’ll be back on track with my PhD submission before I know it!

Also: It really must be said that these great honours would not have happened without the guidance (and co-authorship) of my amazing set of supervisors. So to them, I extend my absolute gratitude!

[Photo credits to Hazel Hall]