A research grant, by proxy

Earlier this year, I worked on writing a grant application to The Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland with my colleague, Dr Gemma Webster. And I am excited to say that the application has been accepted under the Trust’s Research Incentive Grant scheme with Gemma as the Principal Investigator (PI).

The research project is called “Social media by proxy: Strategies for managing the online profiles of adults with dementia”. This work will investigate the lived experiences of people who act as “social media proxies” for adults with dementia in their care.

As the PI and lead applicant, it is Gemma’s experience and role as an established academic that allowed her to make the application (newbies like myself almost always need to ride the coattails of more senior researchers). And it is her experience that will guide the project so that we are in a better position for getting our work published and (hopefully!) creating an even larger funding application that will help us continue our research.

The inspiration for this research comes from Gemma’s past work with vulnerable adults and the recognition that the use of social media by older people is increasing whilst instances of dementia diagnoses are growing. Further, my own doctoral investigation into the role of online information in the building and management of personal reputation found that some participants have helped or noted concerns about vulnerable individuals in their lives and their use of social media. When considered together, we determined that the role of social media proxies for adults with dementia was a relevant and timely topic that warranted further research.

My role in this project is that of the research assistant. I will be work on the literature review, the design of the study, and data collection. I will also work with Gemma to analyse the results from our data collection and to create research outputs.

We plan to use a combination of participant diaries and in-depth interviews as data collection tools, a process I used for my PhD thesis. Participants (social media proxies) will keep a diary for a set amount of time where they will keep notes related to the online activities they undertake as proxies. This will include information about the specific tasks they undertake as well as any reflective thoughts they have about the tasks. Interviews will take place after the diary-keeping exercise and will include a range of topics related to participants’ roles as social media proxies.

We plan to report on this research through (1) a project report; (2) an academic journal article; (3) guidance materials for social media proxies (for example, leaflets); and (4) an article in The Conversation. A dissemination event for stakeholders will also be planned towards the end of this project. That event will include care home workers, carers of dementia patients, local authority officials, and members of third sector organisations that provide support to vulnerable and/or incapacitated groups.

On a personal note, I am grateful to Gemma for providing me the opportunity to work with her on this project. It will be my first piece of work after submitting my thesis, and it kind of serves as my first external grant (by proxy, in a round-about way). I am looking forward to learning from Gemma as she supervises my work and I’ll try not to let her down!

For more information about this research project, please contact me (f.ryan@napier.ac.uk) or Gemma Webster (g.webster@napier.ac.uk)

CSI summer meeting: A brief recap

Earlier this month, the Centre for Social Informatics group at Edinburgh Napier University’s School of Computing met for our bi-annual meeting. These meetings are a great opportunity for all of us to come together to share the great work we’ve done over the previous six months, and to discuss our current and future research projects and aims.

The meeting was chaired by Emeritus Professor Elisabeth “Lizzie” Davenport. Others in attendance were Hazel Hall, Alistair Duff, Colin Smith, Laura Muir, Tom Kane, Gemma Webster, Ella Taylor-Smith, Iris Buunk, Lyndsey Jenkins, and our newest PhD student, Alicja Pawluczuk. We also had a guest from the Centre for Computing Educational Research group, Pritam Chita, join us. Oh, and me. I was there, too.

I had intended to share individual updates for everyone. However, I know that if I try to write it all up, linking to the appropriate projects and stories, I will never get this posted. (And I will continue to fall behind on my other tasks.) So, below is a more general update for you.

The group shared a wide range of updates including successfully published papers and conference acceptances; collaborations both within and outside of the university; invited talks and presentations; and applications for funding bids and research proposals. The group also shared a number of updates about successful funding bids, winning awards, and the excitement of Ella’s PhD graduation next week.

Over the next six months, I expect there to be even more great updates—including, hopefully, my thesis submission! And maybe I’ll be in a better place to share a more detailed recap of the next meeting, too!