Starting conversations: Questions of gender

questionAs part of my role as a student ambassador for Edinburgh Napier University’s Connect Network, I’ve spent a bit of time in the foyer at the Merchiston campus trying to get people talking about women in STEM. (Along with co-ambassador, Melanie Robinson, of course.)

Last week, we decided to use our time to ask passers-by three quick-and-easy questions, with the aim of (1) gauging the thoughts of others and (2) engaging in a bit of conversation about women in STEM.

In total, we had 45 willing participants—each rewarded with a small pack of Haribo for their efforts—and whilst the results might not be scientific, they were pretty interesting. Below are our questions, the results, and our feedback on them.

1) Did you know that a woman invented frequency-hopping, the technology behind things such as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi?
Of the 45 participants, only one person had a vague memory of that information, and even then she couldn’t be certain that she knew for sure. Most people were very interested to hear that, not only was it true, but that the woman was a 1940’s Hollywood starlet and that it was created as a signal jammer to deter torpedoes during WWII.

We’d like to think that they’ll remember that fun fact every time they connect to a WiFi hotspot!

Results:
Yes, I knew that! (2%)
No, that’s news to me! (98%)

2) True or False: It is important to breakdown gender stereotypes before children start school.
The responses to this statement was an interesting one. Our first person answered “false” without hesitation, but explained that she was only here for six months (a Chinese student on an exchange) and that her cultural views were different. Others stopped to ask what we meant by gender stereotypes before they went on to answer “true”.

Interestingly, two men noted that they knew the “socially acceptable” answer was “true”, but they didn’t think that was the right answer. They seemed slightly uncomfortable to admit such a thing, but felt that someone needed to. A third said it would depend on which stenotypes were being questioned.

So that’s 41 solid “true” repliers, 3 for “false”, and 1 fence-sitter.

Results:
True (91%)
False (7%)
Undecided (2%)

3) What percent of engineering and technology undergraduates are women
Unsurprisingly, 18 out of the 45 thought this number was 40% or higher (3 of those were 50% or higher). A further 17 believed the number to be in the 20-30% range, with only 10 people guessing less than 20%—and seven of those thought it was in the single digits.

The truth is that only about 12% are women—a fact that seemed to garner surprise by most people, especially those who thought the numbers would be in the 40s.

This question seemed to spark a lot of curiosity, with people wondering why the numbers were so low and what we could do to improve things. (A perfect opportunity to explain that Connect and Interconnect exists was one of many ways to help.)

Results:
More than 50% = 7%
40-50 = 33%
20-30 = 38%
Less than 20% = 22%

All-in-all, it was a learning experience for us as well as our participants. Hopefully, our next attempt at starting conversations will lead to even more interesting results. I’d love to hear your thoughts on these questions and the results.

Finding a method to my madness

2014.02.27.research-word-cloud[To jump right in] Last week’s panel review meeting went rather well. I was (as predicted) worrying about (mostly) nothing and the review was a simple(ish) chat about my progress to date. Of course, there had been an expectation that I might have had a bit more work to show as it was a “6-month review” but when it was explained that I started late and was therefore only at my 4-month mark, it all started to make sense.

One of the biggest things I took away from the meeting was that I really need to start giving more thought to my research methodologies. I mean, it’s great that I know I want to research how people manage their reputation online, but how do I actually accomplish that? (Yes, these are things you need to think of as a researcher!)

(In fairness to myself, I have known all along that I would need to pin down my methodologies, I’ve just yet to actually put a stake in the ground.)

Do I use in-depth interviews to really investigate how individuals manage their online reputations?

Do I use a large-scale survey to determine the percentage of people who do x, y, or z in the management of their online reputations?

Do I hold focus groups with the hope of generating a bit of conversation around topic?

Do I use observational tools, looking at publicly available data and information to make conclusions of what people appear to be doing—or not doing—in an effort to manage their reputation?

Or do I use a combination of methods?

And what about the validation process? How will I go about validating my research, especially if I’m opting to use in-depth interviews and case studies?

As you can probably tell, I don’t actually have an answer to these questions. In fact, the more I try to find an answer, the more I start to ask more questions! (Ah, the questions-answers-questions loop. It can be frustrating at times.)

So in an effort to help me determine what methods to use in my research, I’m doing what any good researcher would do: I am researching!

I am currently re-reading research articles to determine the varying methods that have been successfully implemented in the past. From there, I hope to be able to identify a couple of methodologies that seem likely to fit with my project.

At the same time, I will be accessing other PhD theses to see what methods others have used—as well as what methods others have eschewed—and their reasoning behind those decisions.

Over the weekend, I will make a list of further research articles to read, in the hopes of expanding my knowledge of existing studies so that I can better determine what methods might work for me. And—with a bit of hard work and a touch of luck—by next Friday’s supervision meeting I will be ready to talk to my supervisors about 2-3 potential methods.

Importantly, all of this research into research methods will also help me with my next big milestone: The completion of my RD4 form, which is an expanded research proposal that will include my intended methodologies.

As always—I’m open to input from others so please feel free to point me towards some great resource you think I should be considering!