TAPESTRY Sandpit: Register your interest today!

DEADLINE EXTENDED UNTIL FRIDAY, 24 JANUARY!

Calling all PhDs and Early Career Researchers (ECRs) for a sandpit-style workshop.

When is it? February 3-4 @ University of Surrey, UK

Who is it for? PhD students or Early Career Researchers (ERCs) working on topics in Trust, Identity, Privacy and Security (TIPS)

Register your interest by 24 January 2020 using the Sandpit Expression of Interest Form.

What is TAPESTRY? TAPESTRY is a socio-technical study of trust in online identities – the psychology of how trust is engendered on and off-line, how we can design for trust, and how emerging technologies such as AI and Blockchain can help create tools that enable us to make better trust decisions online. Further information can be found on the short video below.

What happens at the event? We are running a facilitated sandpit workshop on 3-4 February to explore novel applications of research outcomes from the EPSRC / UKRI Digital Economy funded TAPESTRY project. For more information on Sandpits, see these resources from the EPSRC – but note this event is being run by the TAPESTRY team not EPSRC (please apply using our EOI form below). The sandpit will be highly multi-disciplinary and we welcome applications from all disciplines across Sciences, Arts and Humanities.

As part of the Sandpit, participants will learn more about the TAPESTRY project. They will then form teams, and develop proposals to explore new uses of the social insights and technical tools that have been developed during TAPESTRY. We will award £10,000 of funding at the Sandpit, across the top three proposals. The three successful teams will then have three months to deliver their mini-projects, before attending a follow-up workshop to present a report on their research.

Please fill out the Expression of Interest (EOI) form if you would like to attend the Sandpit.

Register your interest by 24 January 2020 using the Sandpit Expression of Interest Form.

** Funding to support attendance is available **

Bursaries: PhD/ECRs selected to attend will be awarded a bursary of up to £200 GBP to support travel. Accommodation will be provided for 3rd February, plus meals during the Sandpit. Academics/supervisors may also attend at own cost. In both cases please use the EOI form above.

Key dates:
Event: 3-4 February, University of Surrey, Guildford UK
Apply via EOI form by: 24 January 2020 — DEADLINE EXTENDED!
Notification of acceptance: 24 January 2020

Questions? Contact me here or via Twitter.

What is TAPESTRY?

I have been working at the University of Dundee since April on an EPRSC-funded research project called TAPESTRY: Trust, Authentication and Privacy over a DeCentralised Social Registry. My role in the project is as a qualitative researcher looking at how individuals determine trust in real-world online environments, such as online health forums and online dating. But there is much more to the project than that.

The multi-disciplinary project is ultimately quite technical when compared to my own skillset and research areas. That means that I sometimes struggle to explain the full project. (I find it quite fun and easy to explain my part of the project though, which is nice!) In the end, I generally explain that the project aim is to build a tool that helps people to stay safe online.

But as luck would have it, we have just finailsed a short video that helps to explain the project in plain language with simple graphics. The video is about a minute and a half and is an easy watch, so check it out below.

And, as always, please contact me if you have any questions. I might not be able to answer the super-technical ones, but I can certainly talk about the human information behaviour side of the equation!

A study on trust and online dating

As part of my work with the Living Digital group at the University of Dundee, I am starting to recruit participants for a study related to trust and online dating. I will be using qualitative interviews and focus groups for this study, and I am hoping to have about 20 participants.

This study forms part of a larger project that looks at how users establish trusting relationships online. In total, we will look at four different scenarios in which users make trust judgments online: e-commerce, health forums, online dating, and managing ‘Internet of Things’ devices. For my qualitative portion of the project, I will aim to outline key factors that contribute to trust behaviour in a particular online environment. These findings will then be further examined in future studies, which will contribute to the development of an automated system for authenticating the online identity of other users who you are interacting with.

You can learn more about the larger project, TAPESTRY: trust, authentication and privacy over a decentralised social registry, here.

If you would like to participate in this study, you can contact me or visit my recruitment page here. And, as always, please feel free to share with your friends!

My new post-doc at Dundee

I started a new job last week and I am quite excited about it. The job is a short-term contract as a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Dundee (through November). During this time, I will be working with Professor Wendy Moncur on an EPRSC-funded research project, TAPESTRY: Trust, Authentication and Privacy over a DeCentralised Social Registry.

The TAPESTRY team is studying the socio-digital design of trusted services, and developing novel blockchain and machine learning solutions for identity assurance. It is a collaborative project between the University of Surrey’s Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing (project lead) and Centre for Cyber Security, the Department of Media Communication and Design at the University of Northumbria Newcastle, and the Duncan Jordanston College of Art and Design at the University of Dundee (that’s where I am).

The aim of the project is to investigate, develop, and demonstrate new ways to enable people, businesses and services to connect safely online, exploiting the complex “tapestry” of multi-modal signals woven by their everyday digital interactions. Through this project, the team will develop a de-centralised registry that stores trails of users’ digital activity, enabling users to share portions of it to prove they are trustworthy – without giving away so much information that it violates their privacy. By doing this, the work will de-risk the Digital Economy, delivering completely new ways of determining or engendering trust online, and enabling users and businesses to make better decisions about who they trust online.

Now, if you’re wondering how I managed to land a job on such a techy project, it’s simple: Sometimes the technical side of life needs a bit of the human side of life to help weave things together. (weave, tapestry… get it?)

To that, my role on the project is to run two qualitative studies looking at different aspects of determining trust in online environments. I am just starting to get my head around the details of what I’ll be doing, so I won’t get into the details here just yet. However, I will share more about this work as time goes on.

This will be my first time contributing to a large-scale study of this kind, which will be a learning experience in its own right. I will also be balancing this role along with my post-doctoral work on my “social media proxies” project, as well as completing my thesis edits. So, I expect it to be a fairly chaotic few months. But chaotic in a good way (I hope!)

Wish me luck!