The conference circuit

I’ve had a busy few weeks of conferences and seminars and am finally catching my breath again. I had originally planned to share each of these events separately, but I was fighting off the deadly common cold for much of my time on the “conference circuit” so never got around to it. Still, this is a good exercise in getting back to my PhD blog!

The first conference was the SICSA PhD Conference, held in St Andrews. The two-day event was open to Scotland-based computer science and informatics PhD students and provided opportunities for workshops and presentations.

I jumped at the opportunity to present my first academic poster at the event and was pleased to have been shortlisted for a prize. (Sadly, I didn’t make the final cut, but it felt good to be shortlisted for my first poster out of the gate!)

The following week I attended the Scottish Graduate School of Social Science (SGSSS) Summer School in Edinburgh. It was a bit difficult to decide which seminars to attend, and I admit that one or two of them were the wrong choice, but I gained a lot of useful information from all of them. (Yes, even the wrong choice ones.)

The best takeaways from the week were a better understanding of my own philosophical leanings (as they pertain to research) and some great insights into the design of mixed methods studies. And, of course, I made some excellent connections with other PhD students and some of the academic presenters.

Last week saw me travelling to Glasgow for the SGSSS Research Methods in Information Science workshops at the University of Strathclyde. I was very excited about the literature review workshop as that’s my biggest task for the summer. I’ve attended a couple of shorter literature review sessions, but this one gave such a great explanation of a narrative literature review that I feel everything else makes more sense now.

Of course, last week was also the 2014 iDocQ (also in Glasgow) which was by far the best of all of the conferences! OK, I have to say that because I was on the planning committee and chaired most of the day’s programme. (It truly was a team effort though, with Calum Liddle of The University of Strathclyde, Wachi Klungthanaboon of The University of Glasgow, and Chikezie Emele of Robert Gordon University all pitching in to do their fair share of the work.)

One of the delegates, Christine Irving, gave such a wonderful recap of the event that I’ll point you there for the full account!

I now have a bit of downtime (read: time to work on my literature review!) before my next conference (iFutures in Sheffield). I plan to present a poster and submit a paper for the conference proceedings there and am looking forward to yet another conference experience. And, hopefully, I won’t be sick this time!

[Photo Copyright Lynn Killick, one of my awesome office mates.]

Retreat, retreat!

I’ve been meaning to update this blog for a while now, but have been in retreat mode. And when you’re in retreat mode, sometimes blogs get ignored. (I am suppressing the urge to say “sorry about that”, for reasons explained below.)

Retreat No 1: I’ve been busy and stressed trying to meet a few deadlines, meaning I’ve retreated into my own little world—a bad habit, I know. This retreat mode was also because I was (am, in some cases) unsure about things. Like, what do I share here? What’s relevant? What do people want to read? Who’s my audience (Mum!)?

I am still unsure about a lot of these things, but I’m going to take a page from my personal blogging experiences of “blog to blog” when I’m shying away from writing. (It’s like the writers’ trick to “just write any old rubbish” as a way of getting the useful juices slowing.)

But that’s the “poor me” retreat mode so let’s move on to the fun stuff!

Retreat No 2: This was a real retreat with some of my fellow School of Computing PhD students to a loch-side retreat centre near the Highlands. It was simple and short but gave me the opportunity to share a short presentation of my research with some of my fellow students and teaching staff, who then provided a bit of feedback.

One of the most valuable bits of feedback was from one of my supervisors who suggested that I stop apologising—for my research; for being on the “soft” side of computing science; for not having all the information. (I then apologised for apologising too much. A problem I really do need to fix as I do it in all aspects of my life and it impacts my confidence. See first paragraph.)

And as this was my first official presentation as a PhD student, I thought I’d mark it by opening a SlideShare account so that I can share it with you!

(Yes, there was fun activity stuff at the retreat, too, as evident by the “selfie” of me after a cycle ride to a ruined castle.)

But it’s time to move on from retreats and talk about what’s next and what blog posts you can expect from me in the near future.

The biggest thing is that I’ll be giving a 20/20 presentation next Tuesday that will expand on my retreat presentation—and will hopefully see me not apologising.

After that, I will have a few conferences to talk about (assuming my abstracts are accepted!) and will be able to share a bit more information about my literature searching and current reading lists. There might even be an opinion/commentary piece or two if I can get the courage to share my thoughts with you.

Prezi or PowerPoint: Can I have both?

I spent a chunk of my day in a very useful Prezi workshop as part of my on-going Vitae Researcher Development Framework training. I wasn’t sure what I would get out of the day, but I’m really looking forward to trying out the new presentation software.

I’ve been an enthusiastic (but not too enthusiastic!) user of PowerPoint for many years and whilst I really enjoy the platform, I am often excited about the latest-and-greatest technologies. After all, moving forward can be a lot more exciting than standing still.

I viewed Prezi as an opportunity to present slideshows with a bit more “wow factor” than PowerPoint allows. And after tooling around for a bit today, I have to say that I was right—there are some amazingly “wow” things you can do with Prezi. (Here’s a good comparison of the two.)

The problem, however, is that I can’t do everything with it.

I admit that my limited use isn’t enough to give a full-on critique of the software, but I’ll go ahead and share my initial thoughts anyhow. If you have anything to add (for or against!) please feel free to comment away.

So, here are my initial thoughts:

Pros:

  • It’s free! (And with an educational license, you get more goodies for free!)
  • You can get artistic with the fully zoomed-out view, giving your presentation a nice “designed” feel
  • It’s online and presentations can easily be shared with links or by embedding them

Cons:

  • It’s all online (unless you pay the big bucks!) meaning you need an Internet connection
  • Despite being able to download your presentation, you need an Internet connection to best show your presentation—especially if you have embedded videos
  • Motion-sickness can be a problem for some audience members

Ideally, I’d like to combine Prezi and PowerPoint features to create the perfect tool for me—and maybe one day some smart software developer will do just that. In the mean time, I must admit that I will be sticking with PowerPoint for any in-person presentation I have to give (not that I have anything on the horizon!). But I think I’ll give Prezi a try for online purposes in an effort to learn the tools a bit better—and in case they ever make some of their online features available offline!

Oh! Here’s the presentation I created today. It’s not much, but it’s a good place to start! (And here’s a link to my Prezi profile!)

(But seriously—if you have any thoughts on the matter I’d love to hear them.)